Art in Children’s Language Classes

Just remember: kids like games, stories, and cartoons.  If we help children to see learning as fun – as the greatest game – then we’ve already done them a great service.

The great thing about using art in language classes is that students can use and hear a variety of language in the process and it can also help them to achieve a relaxed focus beneficial to learning.  Furthermore auditory and visual tasks are easily performed in unison so as students draw they can still talk or listen to stories and music.  The students generally love it, it can help them to focus, you get some peace, and you’ll probably get very happy parents who have visual proof that their children are actually learning or doing something constructive.  If the artwork can help the World then all the better.  In some cases the artwork can be part of a wider campaign.  For example, in America various schools took part in an anti-idling campaign in which students drew posters, displayed them, and then even went out to remind parents in cars to not idle their engines.

While students create posters I sometimes read aloud stories or articles they have previously learned.  You can also make it a game by pausing in mid-speech.  The student that can recall the next sentence, word or idea can get a point for their team.

Tip: Each student must first create a sketch including all the text in pencil.  Then a teacher checks and only once the teacher says or writes that it’s OK can the student start to use pen.  It’s often good to use plenty of the target language in the artwork, such as in speech bubbles and so on.

Example artwork from English classes:


Feel free to get in touch and send images by your students.  High quality artwork with beneficial messages could be put online.

If you have a school in Hong Kong and would like to hire Luc (the Peacemaker founder) for a poster making session with students then feel free to get in touch.  Free for orphanages, charities, and non-profit organizations.

For resources to help when making posters with students see HERE

To see the winning entries in our 2015 poster contest see HERE

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